Contents

Panasonic manufactures a wide range, for any portable electronic or device needs. When shopping for replacement batteries for anything from small hand held electronics to automotives, Panasonic is a excellent choice for batteries.

Panasonic Batteries

Panasonic BatteriesPanasonic makes a variety of dry AGM rechargeable batteries for all types of needs. Panasonic manufactures a wide range, for any portable electronic or device needs. When shopping for replacement batteries for anything from small hand held electronics to automotives, Panasonic is a excellent choice for batteries.Panasonic is a manufacturer of numerous battery types.12 and 6V batteries are used for heavy machinery, automotives, or marine power supplies. 4 and 8 volt batteries are used for a number of things that may require less power like digital cameras and other hand held devices. Panasonic's AGM batteries may be used in a variety of things such as wheelchairs, emergency lighting, small engines, and starters. Panasonic is known for their qualities batteries that will last a lifetime. Panasonic batteries have a number of protective qualities. All batteries are manufactured with resistance to things such as overcharge, improper discharge, vibration, shock, and varying storage conditions. This is very important for batteries that are not used frequently and need to be ready on demand.Panasonic batteries vary greatly in price because there are many different types of batteries. Depending, price can range anywhere from $50 to $400. It all depends on the technology of the battery and what it is being used for. Smaller batteries for things like handheld electronics require less power and are generally less expensive. Higher voltage batteries for auto, marine, or other equipment are much larger, heavier, and more costly. Panasonic batteries are a one stop shop for all battery needs. When purchasing Panasonic batteries, consumers can be certain they have purchased a dependable battery that can be relied on for any type of equipment.

Three Cell Phone Companies

Three Cell Phone Companies

The first cell phone I remembered ever seen was the one that Sack Morris in Save by the Bell used to have. It was big and it looked more like a portable phone than a cell phone, and it was not very common for people to have unless you were a business man. However now a days everybody has a cell phone, and the smaller they are, the better. With the invention of new technology cell phones have improved and now you can even take pictures with your cell phone, and even better, make videos. Also you can navigate the internet, write an email, and even take it to another country and still be able to use it. Furthermore they have the possibility to send messages instead of calling people which makes it more affordable and easier to use. Today "cell phones" are so popular that some people rather have cell phones than have regular phones. Also information and pictures taken in your cell phone can be transfer into a computer which is great to connect people since these pictures and information can be send or simply be save for a longer time in a computer. What's more impressive than cell phones themselves is the amount of companies that sell cell phone services, which is good because it creates competition, which creates lower prices. Here in Venezuela there are three major companies: Digitel, Movilnet, and Movistar, which is good because one have the opportunity to compare the different rates and sales that these companies have to offer. My family have Movistar because we have a service Habla Pegado that allows you to talk to any other Movistar as long as you want, which is excellent and cheaper in a family of a large number of people like ours: two parents, and seven children.

Why Is Digital TV Better Than Analog TV?

Why Is Digital TV Better Than Analog TV?

To believe this one should watch both of them and feel the difference on their own. The quality of picture and sound are of high quality which gives you ultimate excitement and satisfaction while watching your favorite programs. Digital TV compresses images which help to broadcast multiple channels at a same band width. Whereas Analog which is generally called as SDTV uses magnetic waves to transmit and display pictures and sound which has been traditionally used. The special features available in Digital TV is surround sound, crystal clear pictures, sharper pictures which is all requires for the latest evolution of television the High Definition Television.Compared to the analog the SDTV is significant as it provides more channels from the same station. If you observe the analog broad casting you will find that it is a hassle the capacity to accommodate only a few stations. Where as with digital it contains more information than the analog.If you already have an analog set and wish to upgrade it to a digital one its possible by using digital tuner decoder though it will display the high quality pictures as provided by the original digital sets. In todays market you find digital quality sets are available and the best news is that their prices have decreased.The cable providers always do not supply with digital cables which digital signals. As such cables do not meet the standards when a digital cable is connected to a digital TV it will receive only analog signal, thus eliminating the advantages of a digital television. A solution for this is the digital quality pictures provided by satellite service providers.Digital TV is used for the latest innovation in entertainment the HDTV. Here you get to watch pictures in a wider screen with more clarity than in analog sets. The picture quality and the audio clarity are far better as compared with the analog.If this revolution from analog to digital continues what about consumers who have analog system is a question which ponders the minds of many.For this a transition period has been set up and that is through the year 2006. If necessity requires then that can be extended too.

Guide in Buying HDTV

Guide in Buying HDTV

I wrote this article originally for the HDTVetc magazine for the August 2003 issue, and it was later published on the HDTV Magazine in 2006. Consumers still go through the same struggle at national-chain stores today. I updated the article to include current HD equipment and technologies. Its tutorial substance and analysis are still applicable today, and are intended to help consumers in making the right purchasing decisions. Enjoy the reading. The following topics are covered in this segment: H/DTV and NTSC TV Systems, What are they? The First Effort of the DTV Transition Quality HDTV, or Quantity DTV, or Both? Backward Compatibility with Legacy Analog TV for Digital Broadcast Satellite/Cable, and the DTV Transition Tuner Integration The Effect DVD had for DTV The Rush for KnowledgeYou have been hearing about HDTV and decided to start looking for one. A friend of yours reminds you that the general knowledge about buying regular TVs from the CRT analog era is not sufficient to select a digital product today, so you quickly review what you read about widescreen, black bars, digital tuners and resolution, and hope things would clear out at the store. You get into the typical nationwide consumer electronic store most people go to, and suddenly see several dozens of HDTV demo sets staring back at you. A salesperson is approaching you, the person's face is familiar; the salesperson is the one that sold you the new dishwasher two weeks ago; now the person is selling HDTVs with authority. At that point you start feeling worried, but you hang in there. Obviously this store is not a quality dedicated A/V retail place. Many consumers make their purchases based on the uninformed advice of untrained staff from typical nationwide consumer electronic chains. In the near past, a typical store could only have one of those HDTVs actually displaying HD, the only one that had an HD tuner; the rest were showing the same image from a video distribution loop not suitable for HD quality. Today perhaps the whole store feed is all HD, and the sets that are staring at you show the same picture, but with different colors, contrast, image enhancements, blacks, whites, etc. because no one bothered to set them correctly. So you start wondering why HDTV is not consistently perfect as is being preached, is that what HDTV is about? The sales person turns toward you and, in the middle of your consumer panic attack, tells you: "trust me, buy this TV, it would look much better at home once connected to an HD tuner". Would you buy a car without test-driving it? Millions of people went through similar experiences since HDTV was introduced in November 1998. Fortunately, some improvement is gradually seen in the stores, especially in dedicated A/V retail stores, which should take more time to help consumers understand the concepts behind each display technology, and not just quickly sell the HDTV inventory with the red tags, as most national consumer electronic chains do. Most consumers love red tag savings, and many leave the stores wallet-happy with a product they do not understand. Perhaps many of those do not actually want to understand because the HDTV technology has been introduced with a complexity level they refuse to deal with to just get a TV. To illustrate the complexity of an HDTV purchase decision you might want to read Is HDTV Complex Enough? The objective of the article you are reading is to help you make your purchase with more confidence, but first allow me to cover the following basic subjects about HDTV: H/DTV and NTSC TV Systems, What are they? You might already know of the US plan to replace our current analog interlaced TV system (NTSC) dated from the 1940's by a digital DTV system, by February 17, 2009. Curiously enough the idea started as "analog" HDTV until General Instruments proposed an all-digital system in 1990. The DTV standard is composed of 18 digital formats grouped into two levels of quality, as approved by the ATSC (American Television Systems Committee) in 1995: 1) SD: Standard Definition, with 480i/p (i:interlaced, p:progressive) viewable horizontal lines of vertical resolution (rows counted from top to bottom), each line with up to 704 total pixels of horizontal resolution (counted from left to right), and with an aspect ratio (relation of width to height in units) of 4x3 (as regular TV), or widescreen 16x9. 2) HD: High Definition, with 720p and 1080i/p viewable horizontal lines of vertical resolution (rows counted from top to bottom), each line with respectively 1280 (for 720p) or 1920 (for 1080i/p) total pixels of horizontal resolution (counted from left to right), and only in widescreen 16x9 aspect ratio. Note that, because is not complex enough, the horizontal lines (rows) are expressed as "vertical" resolution (480, 720, 1080), and the vertical columns made of the aligned pixels on the horizontal lines are expressed as "horizontal" resolution (704, 1280, 1920). DTV was 15 years in the making before it went on the air in November 1998. HDTV is the quality part of DTV, but its implementation is not mandatory, SD is. I will use the term DTV only when addressing the digital TV system in general. Later in 2000, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), allegedly to help confused consumers, created another resolution level in between: ED (enhanced definition). This promoted the 480p SD format to ED level, leaving only the 480i format in the SD level. It also granted any TV the right to be labeled HDTV if capable to display only 810i lines of vertical resolution within the displayed image, rather than 1080i. One can argue how much this intervention from the CEA helped consumers more than helped manufacturers getting rid of mediocre sets. But that was back when CRT based DTV sets were the strength of the market; now most DTV sets are fixed pixel displays and their resolution is clearly specified as a pixel count in both directions. Our current NTSC over-the-air (OTA) TV system is 480i analog interlaced (actually 525i with 480i viewable horizontal lines of vertical resolution). The regular channels of digital satellite and digital cable could be compared to digital SD of broadcast DTV, but they are also transmitting dozens of channels in HDTV. To facilitate the transition, broadcasters were given one extra channel slot from the FCC for the simultaneous broadcasting of the analog and digital versions of their programming. It is a large investment for TV stations to build a DTV facility with new cameras, production, equipment, etc. When DTV is fully implemented, broadcasters have to return one of the two channels, analog over-the-air broadcasting will stop, and current analog TVs, VCRs, TiVos with analog tuners would stop "tuning" as well (but they will still work as display devices if fed with a 480i analog signal from a converter, VHS tape, DVD player, etc). This date was originally set for January 2007 but has been extended to February 17, 2009. Once DTV is implemented, the FCC will auction that spectrum of airwaves. Most OTA terrestrial TV stations are already broadcasting DTV in SD and HD widescreen, and consumers are buying HDTV sets at accelerated pace every year. The First Effort of the DTV Transition Just a look back at CEA's 2003 statistics, on the first 5 years of HDTV approximately 6 million DTVs (of which only 300,000 where integrated with DTV tuners) and 400,000 tuner set-top-boxes (STBs), were sold between 1999 and 2003. By the end of 2007, the HDTV count was 8 times fold, and about 50% of households have digital TV sets, according to the CEA. Back in 1998/9 it was not unusual for first generation HDTV monitors to cost $10,000, and HD STB tuners to cost from $700 to $3,000. It was expensive for early adopters. By the end of 2007, a huge variety in technologies and TV sets was available for every viewing environment. DTV sets are much better in quality, and sell for a small fraction of the price they sold back in 1998. Quality HDTV, or Quantity DTV, or Both? We all love the incredible video quality of HD, however, since HD is not mandated within the DTV plan, it allows a broadcasting station to use the allotted 6 MHz space (for the HD channel), to multicast instead several sub-channels of lower SD quality, as it is actually happening on many stations across the US. When sharing the same 6MHz total bandwidth, SD sub-channels rob about 2-3 Mbps each from the needed bandwidth of an HD channel that by itself should broadcast at 19.4 Mbps (if the station also multicasts an HD sub-channel). The parallel broadcast forces further compression of the 19.4 Mbps HD signal to a lower bit rate to make room for the SD sub-channel, compromising HD quality. In many cases, more than one SD sub-channel is multicast together with the HD sub-channel. When the reduced HD bit rate compresses the signal beyond acceptable limits, it renders a lower quality image with noticeable artifacts, especially on fast moving images in sports, which are more evident, and unacceptable, on large screens (more on it later). It might also be possible that the TV station desires to share some of the bandwidth for data-casting interactive services, or for mobile DTV applications for hand-held portable devices (because there will be no analog broadcasting to those portable devices as well). For more information, check the articles I wrote on the "Mobile DTV" series, where I analyze the potential impact of mobile applications on the quality of an HD channel when robbing from its bandwidth. We all hope that HD will reign, and HD quality will prevail over the digital-quantity business models, and you have to encourage DTV broadcasters to do so, besides, most consumers bought an HDTV not a SDTV. Backward Compatibility with Legacy Analog TV for Digital BroadcastWhen the DTV broadcast is fully implemented in February 17, 2009, there would be backward compatibility with your current analog equipment, but there is a catch, in order for you to watch DTV terrestrial digital channels on your current analog TV you would need a digital over-the-air STB tuner connected to it. Your current analog TV would display an analog interlaced 480i version of the digital image. There is no need to rush for the replacement of an analog TV that might be in good working condition if you just want to continue watching similar quality TV, but you would have to buy a STB digital tuner for broadcast DTV. This applies also to your analog VCR, DVD recorder, TiVo, etc., if you want them to have broadcast tuning independence. A few years ago, DTV STB tuners were relatively expensive, in the $400-$1000 price range, imagine buying a $400 digital tuner for a $30 analog VCR, but they are gradually coming down in price. The US government has approved a subsidy coupon program to help people purchase DTV tuners to facilitate the analog-to-digital transition so existing analog TV sets can continue to be used for broadcast digital DTV. For that purpose, Congress approved a fund of $1.5 billion dollars, with an initial allocation of $990 million dollars to subsidize up to two $40 coupons per household. The coupons became available in January 2008 and can be requested by consumers until March 2009, to use them toward the purchase of two DTV tuners. The two coupons cannot be used together to purchase only one DTV tuner, neither they can be used to buy another type of OTA tuner/DVR STBs, satellite STBs with broadcast DTV tuners into them, or cable STBs. The tuners offered by this program are expected to cost in the $50-$70 range each; the consumer would have to pay the difference after applying the $40 coupon. According to the plan, the tuners would become available by mid February 2008 through the national chains of Best Buy, Circuit City, etc. Although the subsidized tuners are designed to tune digital SD and HD channels, they cannot output the tuned signal other than 480i analog resolution to an analog TV. In other words, the subsidized tuners would not perform as typical HD tuners passing resolutions of 480p, 720p, or 1080i to HDTV devices for HD viewing. Their functionality is just to downconvert because their purpose is backward compatibility to analog TVs, but their price is lower than typical ATSC HDTV tuners with variable output resolutions and digital outputs. Satellite/Cable, and the DTV TransitionIf you are a satellite subscriber you already have the satellite STB you need for their digital SD/HD services. Additionally, most satellite boxes also have a terrestrial ATSC tuner if you want to get free local channels using a VHF/UHF antenna. However, DirecTV introduced a new model in late 2007 without antenna input; the local channels would have to be viewed from the satellite feed, a service they have already for most major cities. If you are a cable subscriber, when the cable company decides to disable the analog feed to your household and supply only the digital feed, you would need a digital-to-analog cable STB to view the digital channels on each analog TV in your house, similar to the approach of the coupon program for broadcast DTV above, but you would have to lease or buy the cable STB, no coupons. Cable companies were authorized by the FCC in late 2007 to continue their analog feed service for another 5 years (up to 2012) if they prefer, but they are not obliged to do so. Cable STBs do not have DTV digital terrestrial tuners into them so you cannot use their STB connected to a UHF/VHF antenna to receive free local channels. Cable companies face at least two alternatives on the analog-to-digital transition between 2007 and 2012: a) If their subscriber base is mostly digital, a cable company might have the incentive to make a large up front investment to acquire enough digital STBs to convert all the remaining analog subscribers as soon as possible to digital tier services, who would have to lease one digital STB for each analog TV. That would release the bandwidth occupied by the analog broadcast channels on the cable feed, which could be used for additional digital channels, and receive an increased revenue if those are premium, VOD, PPV, etc. paid services. b) If the subscriber's base is mostly analog, a cable company might prefer to keep the existing mix of analog and digital STBs, and maintain the analog tier as long as needed until 2012. Since the cable feed bandwidth allocation for the analog broadcast channels must continue with this alternative, the company would have to postpone the potential growth of digital channels and services, but there will not be a need for an up front large investment for expensive digital STBs because there is no forced conversion. This option seems economical for both the company and the subscriber, because a subscriber would not be forced to lease a digital STB for each analog TVs that might be currently connected to the wall coax without a STB, as many non-primary TVs are in most households. While the up front investment of a large number of digital STBs could be expensive to a cable company, there could be a partial offset with the potential revenue received from additional digital pay services such as VOD, PPV, or premium channels. Additionally, the number of digital STBs required for a full digital conversion of the cable feed might be further reduced when considering the growing base of integrated HDTVs with CableCARD tuners expected to increase in 2008 and 2009. However, since the integrated CableCARD tuners within HDTV sets are only unidirectional, there might still be a cable subscriber's base that would still require the bi-directional capabilities of cable HD-STBs for VOD, PPV, and cable supplied programming guide. Each cable company would have to balance those factors until 2012. Tuner IntegrationIn 2002 the FCC issued a "mandatory" plan to gradually integrate digital broadcast tuners into DTV monitors and other tuning devices, such HD DVRs. The plan has been already implemented in 2007 for all the sets larger than 13", and all DTVs on sale today are mandated to include digital terrestrial tuners (except for some industrial/professional models). In most cases they also include a cable on-the-clear tuner for non-premium unscrambled channels, or even include a CableCARD tuner for premium channels and services. As mentioned above, the CableCARD tuners are unidirectional only, and lack the bi-directional features of Video-on-Demand, Impulse Pay-per-View, and cable-company supplied programming guide, for which a separate set-top-box from the cable company would still be needed until integrated TV sets are designed to have bi-directional capabilities on their integrated CableCARD tuners. Industry analysts commented for years that economies of scale would bring down the price of digital tuners to the level of today's very low price analog NTSC tuners within TVs, but the reality is that STBs for ATSC terrestrial, or for cable, satellite, DVRs, etc. (not the down-converting government-coupon STBs) still have a high price, considering that comparatively, large HDTVs came down from the $5,000-$10,000 in 98/99 to more accessible prices below $1000. More on this subject is covered further down. The Effect DVD had for DTVMost of the 6 million people that bought HDTVs on the first 5 years of the transition (98-03) did so NOT to view HD, but rather to enjoy playing widescreen DVDs at 480p. Even now in 2008, after Hi-Def DVD has been already introduced in early 2006, regular DVDs are still a favorite content for DTV, because they certainly display quite well as progressive 480p, or upscaled to 720p or 1080i/p to the native resolution of the digital set (by either the DVD player or the TV set). The same DVD played on an analog TV would only show the image as a 480i interlaced scanning. In addition, an HDTV has the capability to show widescreen DVDs in anamorphic format displaying all the original vertical resolution stored on the disc, while 4x3 analog TVs would show the same DVD letterboxing the image between larger top/bottom bars in order to maintain the wider aspect ratio of the movie, and with less vertical resolution for the image itself.

LCD Versus Plasma - Which One is Best?

A new television is high on everyone's wish list. Who wouldn't love a brand new fifty-inch flat screen TV hanging on their living room wall? The makers of televisions are taking advantage of ever-changing technology by creating scientific marvels that can produce clear pictures and lifelike colors in just a few inches of depth. But all of this technology means that buying a TV is harder than ever. These days, the battle between LCD and plasma is on, and choosing sides can be hard. Which one should you purchase?Why buy a plasma TV?Plasma TV's have a wide viewing angle. This means that the person sitting to the side of the television can enjoy the same picture quality as the person sitting in front of the television. With an LCD, the picture quality diminishes if viewed from an angle. If you plan on mounting your TV high on a wall or above a fireplace, a plasma is your best bet, since the picture will remain clear when viewed from the ground. Plasma TV's are known for having high contrast and deep black levels. This is most evident in nighttime scenes in movies and shows; the colors appear lifelike and every detail shows, even in dark scenes. Plasma TV's are also less expensive than LCD's. When the price per inch is compared, plasma TV's are a budget's best friend.Why buy an LCD?If you are looking to reduce your monthly electricity bills, you will want to purchase an LCD TV. The savings are minimal - often just a few dollars a month - but will add up over the lifetime of the television. And since an LCD TV uses less electricity, it is the greener option. You might also want to purchase an LCD if someone in your family is an avid video gamer. Video games often feature static images, like the score box or the countdown timer, that do not move. With a plasma TV, these static images can burn into the screen; this burn-in is not a problem with an LCD. You also need to consider the level of light in the room. LCD's are well suited to bright rooms. The screen is less reflective than a plasma, and as such will not show the reflections of windows or lights. Also, LCD's have a brighter picture; under the harsh glow of daylight or lamplight, viewers will still see a clear and bright picture on the screen.In a battle between plasma and LCD, there is no clear winner. You should buy whichever television best suits your needs. But before purchasing a TV, you need to remember some key rules. First, match the size of the television to the size of the room; contrary to popular belief, the television should not be larger than the room itself. Second, shop around. Prices for both plasma and LCD TV's are coming down by the day, so you might find a bargain if you do a little comparison shopping. And third, if you are technically challenged, hire someone to install the electrical components for you. This way, you can sit back and enjoy your favorite show with all of your fingers intact.

Alpine Living Air Classic Taking A Closer Look

For more than a decade, Americans have been becoming increasingly aware that the air that they breathe in their homes is generally not of good quality. Between cooking and pet odors, mold, mildew, the widespread use of plastic materials, and carcinogenic cleaning products, many feel that their inside air has been compromised. What do consumers do? Purchase an air purifier. In 1998 I was given the gift of an Alpine Living Air Classic machine. It has been touted as an ideal solution for problem air. Lets see if the product lives up to its billing.As far as "air purifier" s go, the Alpine Living Air Classic [now sold by EcoQuest International] is neither cheap nor does it look cheap. Weighing 19 pounds, the Classic is housed in a wooden cabinet available to consumers in four colors: dark walnut, light oak, putty, and black. It is a solid unit with a thick six foot electrical cord. Claiming coverage of up to 3,000 square feet most homes could operate with just one unit although a second one might be needed if your house is large, indoor air pollution is high, or you have high humidity. Prices currently start at $549 so it is no cheap investment.How does it work? The unit produces ozone which coupled with an active fan it reproduces and spreads the clean, fresh scent of a thunderstorm throughout your home. Okay, I am parroting some of the marketing material...I had to because it isnt that easy to describe.So, does it work? As far as producing the thunderstorm scent it certainly does. As far as getting rid of pollutants, odors, and the like I cannot tell you for sure that it does. Indeed there has been plenty of controversy and government rulings against the reported claims of air purifiers over the years by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency {EPA}, Consumers Union [they produce Consumers Report magazine], and the American Lung Association. The EPA has this to say, whether in its pure form or mixed with other chemicals, ozone can be harmful to health. When inhaled, ozone can damage the lungs. Relatively low amounts of ozone can cause chest pain, coughing, shortness of breath and, throat irritation. It may also worsen chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma as well as compromise the ability of the body to fight respiratory infections." They go on to say, some studies show that ozone concentrations produced by ozone generators can exceed health standards even when one follows manufacturers instructions. Many factors affect ozone concentrations including the amount of ozone produced by the machine(s), the size of the indoor space, the amount of material in the room with which ozone reacts, the outdoor ozone concentration, and the amount of ventilation. These factors make it difficult to control the ozone concentration in all circumstances."In conclusion, the EPA states: Available scientific evidence shows that, at concentrations that do not exceed public health standards, ozone is generally ineffective in controlling "indoor air pollution" . The concentration of ozone would have to greatly exceed health standards to be effective in removing most indoor air contaminants. In the process of reacting with chemicals indoors, ozone can produce other chemicals that themselves can be irritating and corrosive.As you can imagine, I no longer use my Alpine Living Air Classic. It sits in my office, unplugged, and working well in its new role as a coffee cup holder while I work on my computer. Frankly, the claims made against this unit made by the federal government and others are certainly frightening.So, how do I achieve clean air today? Again, by visiting the EPAs site I have learned that there are 3 common approaches to reducing indoor air pollution: Source Control: Eliminate or control the sources of pollution; Ventilation: Dilute and exhaust pollutants through outdoor air ventilation, and Air Cleaning: Remove pollutants through proven air cleaning methods. Of the three, the first approach -- source control -- is the most effective. This involves minimizing the use of products and materials that cause indoor pollution, employing good hygiene practices to minimize biological contaminants (including the control of humidity and moisture, and occasional cleaning and disinfection of wet or moist surfaces), and using good housekeeping practices to control particles. The second approach -- outdoor air ventilation -- is also effective and commonly employed. Ventilation methods include installing an exhaust fan close to the source of contaminants, increasing outdoor air flows in mechanical ventilation systems, and opening windows, especially when pollutant sources are in use. The third approach -- air cleaning -- is not generally regarded as sufficient in itself, but is sometimes used to supplement source control and ventilation. Air filters, electronic particle air cleaners and ionizers are often used to remove airborne particles, and gas adsorbing material is sometimes used to remove gaseous contaminants when source control and ventilation are inadequate. If you are intent on purchasing any air purifier, I recommend that you first do plenty of independent research apart from what the marketers tell you. By following the 3 methods stressed by the EPA you should be able to achieve acceptable indoor cleanliness without resorting to purchasing expensive even dangerous air sanitization equipment.For more information please read:The EPAs Position:
www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/ozonegen.htmlSome Air Purifiers May Produce Dangerous Levels of Ozone:
http://www.ewire.com/display.cfm/Wire_ID/2456What is Ozone Air Pollution?
http://www.alaw.org/air_quality/indoor_air_quality/ozone_generatiors.html

Summary

Panasonic manufactures a wide range, for any portable electronic or device needs. When shopping for replacement batteries for anything from small hand held electronics to automotives, Panasonic is a excellent choice for batteries.